Quote Title Quotation Source
The Only Way Back to Purpose There are things in life which are irreparable; there is no road back to yesterday.

Job’s sense of the irreparable brought him face to face with the thing God was face to face with, and when a man gets there he begins to see the meaning of the Redemption. The basis of things is not rational, common sense tells him it is not; the basis of things is tragic, and the Bible reveals that the only way out is through the Redemption.

Chambers, Oswald: Baffled to Fight Better: Talks on the Book of Job. c1931
Who Makes the Decisions in Your House? Bad counsel brings about a bad end. When most people are faced with a choice they take counsel with Self to see what they should do, never comprehending that Self is often the enemy of God and His purposes. Even if I want to do the will of God the outcome of these conferences always decide against God. I am outnumbered every time for Me and Myself always take sides against God. I have a better idea, subject yourself onto God, give all decisions over to the holy Trinity. With the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit as counsel you will never fail to perform God’s purpose. Go ahead and fire your present counsel and get things back on track with God’s will which is always acceptable and good. Tom Van Hoogen
Possessed by Possessions When the truth begins to dawn on him that those fetters were a horror and a disgrace, then will man begin to understand that having never was, never could be well-being; that it is not by possessing we live, but by life we possess. George MacDonald – The Best of George MacDonald © 2006 Cook Communications Ministries.
The Wounds of Love I turn to the works of violent charity and I discover what the vehemence of perfect zeal may be. Behold, I see some people wounded, some bound, some languishing, some fading away — and all from charity. Charity wounds, Charity binds, charity makes ill, and charity brings about cessation. Which of these is not powerful? Which is not violent? These are the four degrees of burning charity that we are totally intent upon investigating in what follows. Hold steadfast in soul, brethren, and pay heed to her whom you desire so much; hear and pay attention to her whom you so greatly desire. Do you want to hear about wounding charity? — “You have wounded my heart, my sister, spouse, with one of your eyes and one hair of your neck” (Songs 4:9). Do you want to hear about binding charity? — “I will draw them with the chords of Adam, with the bounds of charity” (Hosea 11:4). Do you want to hear about languishing charity? — “Daughters of Jerusalem, if you find my Beloved, tell him I am light wishing with love” (Songs 5:8). Do you want to hear about charity fading away in bringing cessation? — He says, “My soul faded away in your salvation and I have hoped beyond hope in your word” (Psalms 118:81). Charity has its chains; charity makes its wounds… Richard of St. Victor – The Four Degrees of Violent Charity; excerpted from The Essential Writings of Christian Mysticism by Bernard McGuinn copyright 2006 by Random House, Inc.
Monitoring God s Radar Once you have established such a relationship with your Lord, you will soon discover that no fault in you escapes the reproof of God. For instance, as soon as you commit a sin, you are immediately rebuked by an inward sense. It will be a kind of deep, inward burning… a tender confusion. You see, all things are exposed under the piercing glance of your Lord. He will not allow any sin to be hidden or concealed. Jeanne Guyon – Experiencing the Depths of Jesus Christ, circa 1680
Duty-led or Spirit-led? Here’s how the file card works when it gets into the Christian life and begins to create mental habits: It divides the Bible into sections fitted to the days of the year and compels a Christian to read according to rule. No matter what the Holy Spirit may be trying to say to a man, still he goes on reading where the card tells him, dutifully checking it off each day. Every spirit-led saint knows that there are times when he is held by an inward pressure to one chapter, or even one verse, for days at a time while he wrestles with God till some truth does its work within him. To leave that present passage to follow a pre-arranged reading schedule is for him wholly impossible. He is in the land of the free Spirit, and reality is appearing before him to break and humble and lift and liberate and cheer. But only the free soul can know the glory of this. To this the hard bound by system will be for ever a stranger. — Of God and Men A. W. Tozer – The Pursuit of God
Got Life? The difference in effect between the operations of the spirit and the soul is clearly given right here. The soul is itself alive and has life in itself. The spirit, however, is able to give life to others and cause them to live. The soul is itself living, yet it cannot make others live. But the spirit is not only living in itself, it can also make others live. Only the spirit is capable of quickening people into life. The soul, no matter how strong it is, cannot impart life to others. “It is the spirit,” says the Lord, “that giveth life; the flesh profiteth nothing” (John 6:63). Watchman Nee – The Latent Power of the Soul, circa 1939, copyright 1972 by Christian Fellowship Publishers, Inc.
The Backdrop Sets the Scene The eyes, cleansed by weeping, have obtained a clearer vision of life’s profound mystery and beneficent discipline. That is precisely the Master’s meaning. We love the cloudless hours; yet we love still more the days when snowy clouds fleck the skies… we love the exquisite rapture of spring, yet, but for wintertime, we should never know the beauty of the crocus. F. W. Boreham – The Heavenly Octave: A Study of the Beatitudes, Copyright 1936 by F. W. Boreham
For Lovers Only Therefore I am setting forth the following insights to those who have been prepared by divine grace, to the humble and faithful, to those with compunction and devotion, to those anointed “with the oil of gladness” (Psalm 44:8), to the lovers of divine wisdom who are inflamed with its desire, to those wanting to be free to magnify the Lord, to be in awe of Him, and even to taste Him. Bonaventure, From Prologue and Chapters 1 and 7, 1259; excerpted from The Essential Writings of Christian Mysticism by Bernard McGuinn copyright 2006 by Random House, Inc.
Advertisements